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Tracing Your Second World War Ancestors

ebook

The Second World War was the defining conflict of the twentieth century and it is one of the most popular and fascinating areas for historical research – and for family historians. More records than ever are available to researchers whose relatives served during the war. And this new book by Phil Tomaselli is the perfect guide to how to locate and understand these sources – and get the most out of them. He explains how, and from where, service records can be obtained, using real examples showing what they look like and how to interpret them. He also examines records of the military units relatives might have served in so their careers can be followed in graphic detail. The three armed services are covered, along with the merchant navy, the Home Guard, civilian services, prisoners of war, gallantry and campaign medals, casualties, women's services and obscure wartime organizations. Also included are a glossary of service acronyms, information on useful websites, an introduction to the National Archives and details of other useful sources.


Expand title description text
Publisher: Pen and Sword

Kindle Book

  • Release date: December 13, 2011

OverDrive Read

  • ISBN: 9781783830770
  • Release date: December 13, 2011

EPUB ebook

  • ISBN: 9781783830770
  • File size: 1269 KB
  • Release date: January 3, 2014

Formats

Kindle Book
OverDrive Read
EPUB ebook

Languages

English

The Second World War was the defining conflict of the twentieth century and it is one of the most popular and fascinating areas for historical research – and for family historians. More records than ever are available to researchers whose relatives served during the war. And this new book by Phil Tomaselli is the perfect guide to how to locate and understand these sources – and get the most out of them. He explains how, and from where, service records can be obtained, using real examples showing what they look like and how to interpret them. He also examines records of the military units relatives might have served in so their careers can be followed in graphic detail. The three armed services are covered, along with the merchant navy, the Home Guard, civilian services, prisoners of war, gallantry and campaign medals, casualties, women's services and obscure wartime organizations. Also included are a glossary of service acronyms, information on useful websites, an introduction to the National Archives and details of other useful sources.


Expand title description text